Mac Computers Vs Windows Computers-11 Reasons why Mac is Better


To some, the Mac(macintosh) is strange because they have been so used to a computer running windows operating system. I am one the very few African who is very familiar wit the two operating systems. In this article, I will try and convince you beyond reasonable doubt why you should rather buy a mac computer if the price is not a constraint for you. I switched from windows to mac in the year 2013 due to security and battery life constraints, even though it wasn’t easy initially, I am currently very happy that I made the over early enough (at least before the economic recession started afflicting my country Nigeria).

WINDOW AND MAC BUILD

Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh.” Just like with Apple iPhone, there has been a huge phobia, especially from Africa and Asia about using MacBook because they believe it ha huge limitations which can hamper the user experience. I was in your shoes befoe my switch, but now, am better off. Without taking much of your time, let me walk you through why you should buy a mac and how to enjoy it.

Note: my review is based on A windows computer running windows 10 pro operating system with latest updates installed and my mac is a MacBook pro with retina display 13inches running mac os x Yosmite. We have two newer OSes for mac which are  10.11 EL Capitan and 10.12 Sierra.

THE ADVANTAGES APPLE MACBOOK HAVE OVER WINDOWS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

 A MAC COMPUTER CAN ALSO RUN WINDOWS 7, 8 OR 10

This alone speaks volume of the flexibility of the Mac computer. I mean if you buy a mac computer and you simply feels it’s not the Os for you, but you love its beauty and class, then you can easily run a windows OS on your mac in two ways; 1. either a separate partition via Bootcamp (recommended) or 2. Via a virtual box on your existing mac OS.

THE USER EXPERIENCE / INTERFACE.

20170214_075007WINDOWS INTERFACE

I alway say it, the most friendly windows os in terms of user experience was windows XP. The most popular windows OS  is windows 7. The most annoying is windows 8. But with windows 10, Microsoft started getting their grooves back. That notwithstanding, you can never compare the user friendliness of a Mac Os to that of windows. On a Mac PC, everything is just very easy to come by and launch you only need to get used to them. shortcuts on mac is named “Alias”, rename or file editing on mark can be done by right-clicking and selecting “get info” you can shortcut all your apps to the “dock” Windows 8 was something of a car-crash in terms of design and customer satisfaction, with Microsoft trying too hard to push touch-based computing on a desktop using populace that didn’t want it. Updates have cleared up some of the mess, and Windows 10 is shaping up to be a very good OS, but there’s still a long way to go. In contrast OS X sierra .Touch has been ignored, with trackpad and mouse gestures proving to an excellent alternative as it is super-responsive argument is that, do we really need a laptop or desktop computer with a touch screen at this time? The dell under review has a touchscreen that is almost useless to me expect if i want to show off with it. A Mac computer will not crash on you, even if it does, it will recover fully without you losing any of your files

Build quality

MAC vs Windows the built

In all its ramifications, a mac pc is more solidly built than any window PC irrespective of its manufacturer to the extent that windows manufacturers now copy mac’s designs. There’s no denying that Macs are expensive. If all you want is a simple machine for Facebook, shopping and a little work then a Mac isn’t really the best option. Buy a Chromebook instead, as they’re excellent devices that only cost a few dollars and can do all those things very happily. But if you want a device that is built to the highest standards, with top-grade components, elegant styling and almost fanatical attention to detail, then Macs are some of the most beautiful consumer electronic products on the market right now. My reader, you can hardly beat the build quality of a mac with any windows PC

Security

Research shows that we currently have 60,000 known viruses for windows based computers, 40 for mac and 40 for linux. Mac is a close unix OS therefore, you can actually have a virus free experience. the worst you can have is adware. also, you can hardly download a virus to your mac while it’s damn easy getting your windows infected. In Nigeria for example, most well know supermarkets use Apple product for their accounting and computation. The reason is that unlike windows, macs are very very secure. I formatted my windows at least thrice a year because of one security threat or the other. I have not had any reason to do same with the Mac. Mac users have flaunted the apparent invulnerability of their systems in the faces of PC using friends. While we don’t necessarily condone such behaviour, there is indeed a good deal of truth involved. Macs are continually known to suffer less attacks than Windows-based PCs, and by quite a margin. Things are admittedly changing, though, with internet-based attacks on the rise, and hackers are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their approaches. For the time being the Mac is still the safest platform, but users would be well advised to add a dash of caution to their surfing and clicking behaviours, lest complacency usher in the avoidable troubles for you.

OUTSTANDING BATTERY LIFE

This is from a personal experience. I alway get at last 8 hours of battery life on MacBook pro when using it continuously. MacBook air even has a better battery life as you can go up to 11 hours of endurance time on its battery. This is why most DJs around the world will always use a Mac. Many professionals and businessmen and women have also migrated to Mac. If you are a traveller and you don’t want to constantly worry about power, you will surely get a mac computer. The best windows computer cannot challenge a mac computer in a battery duel.

YOU CAN USE A MAC AS A WI-FI ROUTER BY DEFAULT

I remember when i was using a windows computer, it is either I go through series of coding and tweaking or i download a wifi hotspot app like(connectifyme) before I can use my windows as a wi-fi hotSPOT.

Enable Internet Sharing and Configure Your Hotspot

The Wi-Fi hotspot option is part of the “Internet Sharing” feature in Mac OS X. You’ll find it in the System Preferences window. Click the Apple menu, select System Preferences, and click the Sharing icon.Select the “Internet Sharing” option in the list. You’ll now need to select the Internet connection you want to share with the devices.

 

Customer support

If things go wrong then it’s reassuring to know that Apple offers various good support and service options. Apple consistently ranks as one of the best for customer support. Most Apple products come with 90 days of complimentary phone support and a one-year limited warranty.

The support services offered by Apple include telephone support, support using online tools, and support at Apple Retain Stores where you can book an appointment with a Genius. There are also a number of Apple Authorised Service Providers who can help you with any issues you face.

 

A Mac integrates with iOS through Hand-Off

Apple has further strengthened the ties between Macs and iOS devices, if you own an iPhone, iPad or an iPod touch and you do not own a mac, you are missing. This something that has carried through to OS X Sierra. Thanks to the Hand-off feature, you can start an email, note or document on your iPhone or iPad and continue on your Mac without syncing or saving anything to a cloud drive like OneDrive or Google Drive. This also applies for web searches, reminders, maps searches, and calendar adjustments. This close integration is a powerful selling point, as it means your devices all work together to help you complete your tasks without fuss or frustration.

Confusion because there are too many PCs to choose from

Currently, we have countless manufacturers for windows. This might sound like a bad thing, but it’s true that sometimes less is more. Apple offers six different computers that come in various specs and with various build-to-order options. Apple’s Macs include the MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, MacBook, Mac mini, iMac and Mac Pro, and from those, you’ll find a Mac that suits your budget, lifestyle and power requirements. If you are a professional or a graphic designer, you go for macbook pro. If you are simply a light user, go for Macbook air.  The pros are the most powerful mac computers that is capable of performing any task.

Macs have the best screens

I know this is debatable, but if you compare a high-end mac with a high end windows computer, Mac’s display is more accurate and more visually appealing than that of windows.Many might scoff at the idea of a Retina screen (after all isn’t it just a HD display?), but the current range of Retina MacBooks and iMacs boast screens that feature anti-reflective coatings and no air gap, which makes them the best on the market right now.

USER SATISFACTION

In the end, a Mac is an electronic product, and it needs to justify its princely sum to the paying customer. This is, as they say, the bottom line. Thankfully the Mac has spent more than a decade at the top of customer satisfaction surveys, which is no mean feat when you consider that they are expensive items that promise much to the prospective buyer. The fact that Apple delivers the good, literally in many cases, is probably the most compelling argument of all, and shows that most people who purchase Macs have few, if any, regrets. I am a living testimony, I have no regrets. However, Nigeria buyers should beware of whom they buy their MacBook from. Please buy from a trusted dealer only this is because there is no official Apple store in Nigeria yet.

Apple optimises the Hardware and components

Mac computers have virtually the most solid hardware you can think of. Every component in every Mac is optimised for performance and to ensure that it requires less power. Where the argument that Macs feature better-quality components has been moot since the switch to Intel processors in 2006, with Apple using many of the same components in Macs as their PC counterparts, the fact that the company can design its operating system to use these components better is significant. It’s why Apple can issue firmware updates that improve the way certain components work in Macs, and why a new operating system update can actually result in an old Mac achieving better battery life.

PC fans often note the fact that Macs aren’t user-upgradable. These days the only way to add more RAM or a bigger hard drive to your Mac is if you purchase it as a build-to-order option when you first buy the Mac from Apple. For some, this will be a negative, but for many, the idea of upgrading their Mac a few years down the line isn’t something they’d even consider doing.

If you want to be able to customise your machine then a PC might be a better option, but many people just want a machine that works. Unfortunately, one of the negatives of upgrading a PC is the conflicts that arise and the issues faced when the required drivers are missing.

Speaking of drivers: on a Mac you can plug in a camera, printer or install software and it just works. Everything you connect to a mac computer simply works

ARGUMENTS AGAINST A MAC COMPUTER

We have three major arguments on this, only one is very reasonable. I will list the three arguments and counter them as follows:

  1. Mac computers are expensive and overpriced: Yes, macs are expensive and only those who think they can derive the required utility from them, go for them. Conversely, MACs are not overpriced, they give you values for every cent spent n them. I agree that they are for professionals, the rich or classy people in the society. I wouldn’t have gotten a Mac merely for the fun of it.
  2. Software ecosystem: Contrary to what some people believe, there is no good software for windows that you won’t find on mac AppStore(the slight exception is for games software). for every good windows software, there is a corresponding better Mac equivalent. All other things being equal. from my personal experience, I already got all my favourite windows apps on my mac. this includes some games.
  3. Macs are not user-upgradeable: Only recent macs can not be easily upgraded after purchase. old macs are upgradeable while you can pre-upgrade new macs at the point of ordering.

CONCLUSION

Apple devices are majorly misunderstood especially by the ignorant. the same thing happened to the iPhone a couple of years ago and now, every trendy youth in Africa wants to use the iPhone. Do not get discouraged to buy a MAC computer.

Comments

  1. The contenders
    For this comparison I reached for the newest Surface Book. It’s a top-of-the-line model with a Core i7-6600U, a GeForce GTX 965M, 16GB of RAM, and a 1TB SSD. The updated product line varies from $2,400 to $3,300 (our model) in price. All three net you a 6th-gen Skylake dual-core Core i7 chip, and all three get you the same Performance Base with a GeForce GTX 965M. From what I can tell, the only differences are in the size of the SSD and how much RAM you get. Only the SSD would affect performance significantly.

    On the Apple side, I turned to a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15 with a quad-core Core i7-6700HQ, 16GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD. I also had partial access to two MacBook Pro 13’s. The first was the non-touch bar model with a Core i5-6360U, 8GB of LPDDR/1866, and a 256GB SSD ($1,500). The second was the Touch Bar version with a Core i5-6267U, 8GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD ($1,800). I used the performance results from our sister site Macworld’s review for this article.

    mbp13 surfacebooki7 front
    That Surfaced Book cleaned the clock of the MacBook Pro 13 last year. Can it do the same again?
    Let’s make it clear from the outset: This isn’t a direct comparison of the laptops based on cost, but an attempt to compare the performance of the new MacBook Pros to that of similar PC laptops.

    For those who’ve noticed the considerable price delta between the Surface Book i7 and the 15-inch MacBook Pro, the stack of other PCs used in this comparison will help smooth out that line. You might argue that it’s silly to compare a $3,300 Surface Book i7 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,100 Dell XPS 13 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,400 Dell XPS 15 against a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15. But these are all real-world models that you’ll find in a store, rather than configurations contrived to hit a number. Price differences are just part of the comparison puzzle.

    For the same reason, we’re not loading the same OS on all the laptops—no OSX on PCs, no Windows on Macs. Real people wouldn’t do that, and neither will we.

    Cinebench R15 multi-threaded performance
    Our first test is Cinebench R15. This is a 3D rendering test based on Maxon’s Cinema4D engine. The test is heavily multi-threaded, and the more cores or threads you can throw at it, the better the performance. The test is is a pretty harsh reminder that if your tasks demand a quad-core, listen to them.

    Between the two quad-cores, the Dell XPS 15 crosses the finish line first—but not by much. Let’s just call it mostly a tie.

    Among the dual-cores, the Core i5-based MacBook Pro 13 is last, but not by much. It’s basically the same as the last-gen XPS 13 with a similar Core i7-6560U.

    The surprise is where the Surface Book i7 finishes. Its 6th-gen CPU is hanging right with the 7th-generation Kaby Lake CPUs in the new HP Spectre x360 13 and the new Dell XPS 13.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench multi threaded
    Cinebench R15’s multi-threaded benchmark shows you the clear difference between quad-core and dual-core CPUs. Longer bars indicate better performance.

    Cinebench R15 single-threaded performance
    Cinebench R15 has an optional test that lets you measure the single-threaded performance. It’s a valuable way to gauge how fast a laptop will be in applications or tasks that don’t use all the cores available.

    The surprise to many will be the result from the Dell XPS 13. Its 7th-generation Core i5 CPU could hang with the Core i7 chips on heavier loads, but on lighter loads, it ends up being last. That’s because Core i7 chips in laptops excel at short, “bursty” loads. Once you heat them up, the clock speeds crank back. When running a test in single-threaded mode, the Core i7’s advantage with short burst loads shows up big-time.

    The real shocker is how the HP Spectre x360 with a 7th-gen CPU comes out the clear winner. I would’ve expected the quad-core MacBook Pro 15 or Dell XPS 15 to lead the pack, but nope. That Kaby Lake CPU is indeed pulling its weight.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench single threaded
    We switched Cinebench R15 into a mode where it measures single-threaded CPU performance. Overall, there’s little difference in single-threaded loads.

    Surface Book i7 vs. MacBook Pro: Fight!
    Ali vs. Frazier, Red Sox vs. Yankees, Kirk vs. Khan. And of course, Mac vs. PC.

    Gordon Mah Ung
    Dec 6, 2016 3:31 AM
    Now that Apple’s introduced the first major update to its MacBook Pro lineup in years, it’s time to square off the best of the best in Mac and PC laptops to see who currently prevails in this age-old rivalry.

    surfacevsmbp15 2
    It’s benchmarks at dawn between the new MacBooks, the new Surface Book i7, and a posse of other Windows laptops.

    The contenders
    For this comparison I reached for the newest Surface Book. It’s a top-of-the-line model with a Core i7-6600U, a GeForce GTX 965M, 16GB of RAM, and a 1TB SSD. The updated product line varies from $2,400 to $3,300 (our model) in price. All three net you a 6th-gen Skylake dual-core Core i7 chip, and all three get you the same Performance Base with a GeForce GTX 965M. From what I can tell, the only differences are in the size of the SSD and how much RAM you get. Only the SSD would affect performance significantly.

    On the Apple side, I turned to a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15 with a quad-core Core i7-6700HQ, 16GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD. I also had partial access to two MacBook Pro 13’s. The first was the non-touch bar model with a Core i5-6360U, 8GB of LPDDR/1866, and a 256GB SSD ($1,500). The second was the Touch Bar version with a Core i5-6267U, 8GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD ($1,800). I used the performance results from our sister site Macworld’s review for this article.

    mbp13 surfacebooki7 front
    That Surfaced Book cleaned the clock of the MacBook Pro 13 last year. Can it do the same again?

    Why this contest isn’t rigged

    DealPosts
    Save $50 on the PlayStation 4 Slim 500GB Console, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Legacy Bundle – Deal Alert
    22% off Intel NUC Kit Mini PC – Deal Alert
    57% off Anker LED Water-Resistant Rechargeable 1300 Lumen Flashlight – Deal Alert
    Let’s make it clear from the outset: This isn’t a direct comparison of the laptops based on cost, but an attempt to compare the performance of the new MacBook Pros to that of similar PC laptops.

    For those who’ve noticed the considerable price delta between the Surface Book i7 and the 15-inch MacBook Pro, the stack of other PCs used in this comparison will help smooth out that line. You might argue that it’s silly to compare a $3,300 Surface Book i7 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,100 Dell XPS 13 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,400 Dell XPS 15 against a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15. But these are all real-world models that you’ll find in a store, rather than configurations contrived to hit a number. Price differences are just part of the comparison puzzle.

    For the same reason, we’re not loading the same OS on all the laptops—no OSX on PCs, no Windows on Macs. Real people wouldn’t do that, and neither will we.

    CSO staff
    We opted to test on the operating system that people will run on the computer they buy.

    03 osx windows
    Cinebench R15 multi-threaded performance
    Our first test is Cinebench R15. This is a 3D rendering test based on Maxon’s Cinema4D engine. The test is heavily multi-threaded, and the more cores or threads you can throw at it, the better the performance. The test is is a pretty harsh reminder that if your tasks demand a quad-core, listen to them.

    Between the two quad-cores, the Dell XPS 15 crosses the finish line first—but not by much. Let’s just call it mostly a tie.

    Among the dual-cores, the Core i5-based MacBook Pro 13 is last, but not by much. It’s basically the same as the last-gen XPS 13 with a similar Core i7-6560U.

    The surprise is where the Surface Book i7 finishes. Its 6th-gen CPU is hanging right with the 7th-generation Kaby Lake CPUs in the new HP Spectre x360 13 and the new Dell XPS 13.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench multi threaded
    Cinebench R15’s multi-threaded benchmark shows you the clear difference between quad-core and dual-core CPUs. Longer bars indicate better performance.

    Cinebench R15 single-threaded performance
    Cinebench R15 has an optional test that lets you measure the single-threaded performance. It’s a valuable way to gauge how fast a laptop will be in applications or tasks that don’t use all the cores available.

    The surprise to many will be the result from the Dell XPS 13. Its 7th-generation Core i5 CPU could hang with the Core i7 chips on heavier loads, but on lighter loads, it ends up being last. That’s because Core i7 chips in laptops excel at short, “bursty” loads. Once you heat them up, the clock speeds crank back. When running a test in single-threaded mode, the Core i7’s advantage with short burst loads shows up big-time.

    The real shocker is how the HP Spectre x360 with a 7th-gen CPU comes out the clear winner. I would’ve expected the quad-core MacBook Pro 15 or Dell XPS 15 to lead the pack, but nope. That Kaby Lake CPU is indeed pulling its weight.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench single threaded
    We switched Cinebench R15 into a mode where it measures single-threaded CPU performance. Overall, there’s little difference in single-threaded loads.

    Cinebench R15 OpenGL performance
    Our last Cinebench R15 test measures performance with OpenGL, a popular graphics API used for rendering professional CAD/CAM applications and a few games.

    The results here break down into three bands. At the bottom is the new MacBook Pro 13 and an older Dell XPS 13 model. Both use Intel’s Skylake CPU and include “faster” Iris 540 graphics with 64MB of embedded DRAM inside the CPU. Both are nearly dead-even, which validates this test for comparing OSX to Windows 10 performance.

    The second band up is a shocker to me. The pair of 7th-gen Kaby Lake laptops from Dell and HP are a good 25 percent faster than the 6th-gen Skylake laptops in OpenGL. I really expected the Iris 540 laptops to come out in front. The results make me wonder whether this isn’t some driver optimization that Intel put into Kaby Lake but not Skylake.

    The last band is the graphics performance of the discrete-GPU laptops. Unexpectedly, the GeForce GTX 960M in the XPS 15 finishes just ahead of the GTX 965M in the Surface Book i7. The MacBook Pro 15, with its Radeon Pro 450, finishes in a firm third place. Some MacBook Pro reviews have said the graphics don’t measure up in games, while in “work”-related tasks, they rules. So far, I’ve not seen that to be true.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench opengl
    Maxon’s Cinebench R15 can also measure OpenGL performance. The MacBook Pro 15’s Radeon Pro 450 is competent, but the Surface Book i7 and XPS prevail.

    GeekBench 4.01 multi-threaded performance
    Another popular cross-platform benchmark is Primate Lab’s GeekBench. Experts may disdain its cross-platform results between ARM and x86. Within the same micro-architecture, however, I think it’s pretty kosher, especially when running the newest 4.01 version of the popular test. I also have a score to report for the MacBook Pro 13 with Touch Bar, as I cribbed the performance of the version with Core i5-6267U and Iris 550 from Macworld’s review.

    The first result we’ll look at is the multi-threaded performance. Like Cinebench R15, you can see the quad-core XPS 15 and MacBook Pro 15 step away from the dual-core laptops. It’s just more proof that if your tasks really need a quad-core chip, pay for it.

    On the dual-cores, the redesigned HP Spectre x360 13 again shows the newest 7th-gen Core i7’s clock speed advantage over the Skylake models. The Surface Book i7 and MacBook Pro are pretty much dead-even. For MacBook Pro 13 fans that might be something to crow about, because we’re talking about a Core i5 MacBook Pro 13 vs. a Core i7 Surface Book.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 multi threaded
    The PC laptops win a moral victory in GeekBench 4.01, but they virtually tie with the MacBook Pros.

    GeekBench 4.01 single-threaded performance
    Moving on to the single-threaded performance in GeekBench 4.01, there are a few patterns we can discern. First, that 7th-gen Core i7 in the HP Spectre x360 13 is indeed faster in lighter loads, outpacing the Surface Book i7 and the Core i5-equipped MacBook Pro 13 with Touch Bar.

    The Dell XPS 15 inches over the MacBook Pro 15, but the real takeaway is this: If you don’t do many multi-threaded tasks on your laptop, you don’t need a quad-core CPU.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 single threaded performance
    When we used Geek Bench 4.01 to measure single-threaded performance, there was scant difference between dual-core and quad-core laptops in lighter loads.

    GeekBench 4.01 OpenCL performance
    GeekBench also has an OpenCL test that simulates popular Computer Language tasks on a GPU that would normally be handled by the CPU.

    The first takeaway: Unlike in the OpenGL performance tests, the older Iris 540 in the Skylake dual-cores is faster than the Kaby Lake integrated graphics for whatever tasks Prime Labs thinks best represent OpenCL.

    The second takeaway: OpenCL loves fast GPUs. The Surface Book i7 and its GTX 965M run away with this test, and trash the MacBook Pro 13. For those who didn’t pony up for the MacBook Pro’s faster Radeon Pro 455 or 460 GPU, it’s hard to watch how thoroughly the the Surface Book i7 smokes the 450-equipped MacBook Pro. The Surface Book’s GTX 965M even makes a mockery of the GTX 960M in the XPS 15.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 opencl
    Geek Bench 4.01 can also be used to measure OpenCL, which uses the GPU to perform tasks typically done on a CPU.

    LuxMark 3.1 OpenCL GPU Render Performance
    When you play the benchmarketing game, one truth that’s often overlooked is that no one test defines the entire category. You can’t take the results from Geek Bench 4.01 OpenCL and declare it representative of all OpenCL performance.

    To balance Geek Bench 4.01, I also ran the free LuxMark 3.1 OpenCL test. This takes a scene and renders it using the LuxRender engine on the GPU (or CPU if you ask it to.) I decided to skip the integrated-graphics laptops because I couldn’t wait days for them to render (kidding) and focused solely on the laptops with discrete graphics.

    The results put these GPUs a lot closer than the OpenCL numbers from Geek Bench 4.01 would have you believe. In the end, both the XPS 15 and Surface Book i7 again both clearly win. But would this be true if it were a Radeon 460 in the MacBook Pro 15? Probably not.

    macbook pro 15 luxmark 3.1 luxball gpu render
    We used LuxMark 3.1 to measure the OpenCL performance of the graphics chips. The higher the score, the better the performance. In this one test, the MacBook Pro 15 is at least competitive.

    Blender 2.78 Performance
    The last “work”-related graphics test we’ll run is Blender 2.78. This a free rendering application popular in a lot of indie movies. For a test render file, I used Mike Pan’s BMW Benchmark and set Blender to ray-trace the scene on the GPU rather than the CPU. The result is, frankly, beyond ugly. The Surface Book i7 finished in about eight minutes, and the XPS 15 took another two more minutes. The MacBook Pro 15 took more than an hour to complete the task.

    This doesn’t mean the MacBook Pro 15’s Radeon Pro 450 is a dog. The other benchmarks should tell you that the Apple isn’t that bad in some tasks. Still, this kind of performance disparity indicates a serious problem at the OS or driver level, or something with this compile of Blender. Unless or until that mystery is solved, you’ll want to do your Blender renders on a PC laptop.

    macbook pro 15 blender 2.78a bmw gpu
    Something isn’t right on the MacBook Pro 15 because while the Surface Book i7 took eight minutes to render a scene, the MacBook Pro 15 struggled for an hour. An hour.

    Surface Book i7 vs. MacBook Pro: Fight!
    Ali vs. Frazier, Red Sox vs. Yankees, Kirk vs. Khan. And of course, Mac vs. PC.

    Gordon Mah Ung
    Dec 6, 2016 3:31 AM
    Now that Apple’s introduced the first major update to its MacBook Pro lineup in years, it’s time to square off the best of the best in Mac and PC laptops to see who currently prevails in this age-old rivalry.

    surfacevsmbp15 2
    It’s benchmarks at dawn between the new MacBooks, the new Surface Book i7, and a posse of other Windows laptops.

    The contenders
    For this comparison I reached for the newest Surface Book. It’s a top-of-the-line model with a Core i7-6600U, a GeForce GTX 965M, 16GB of RAM, and a 1TB SSD. The updated product line varies from $2,400 to $3,300 (our model) in price. All three net you a 6th-gen Skylake dual-core Core i7 chip, and all three get you the same Performance Base with a GeForce GTX 965M. From what I can tell, the only differences are in the size of the SSD and how much RAM you get. Only the SSD would affect performance significantly.

    On the Apple side, I turned to a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15 with a quad-core Core i7-6700HQ, 16GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD. I also had partial access to two MacBook Pro 13’s. The first was the non-touch bar model with a Core i5-6360U, 8GB of LPDDR/1866, and a 256GB SSD ($1,500). The second was the Touch Bar version with a Core i5-6267U, 8GB of LPDDR/2133, and a 256GB SSD ($1,800). I used the performance results from our sister site Macworld’s review for this article.

    mbp13 surfacebooki7 front
    That Surfaced Book cleaned the clock of the MacBook Pro 13 last year. Can it do the same again?

    Why this contest isn’t rigged

    DealPosts
    Save $50 on the PlayStation 4 Slim 500GB Console, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Legacy Bundle – Deal Alert
    22% off Intel NUC Kit Mini PC – Deal Alert
    57% off Anker LED Water-Resistant Rechargeable 1300 Lumen Flashlight – Deal Alert
    Let’s make it clear from the outset: This isn’t a direct comparison of the laptops based on cost, but an attempt to compare the performance of the new MacBook Pros to that of similar PC laptops.

    For those who’ve noticed the considerable price delta between the Surface Book i7 and the 15-inch MacBook Pro, the stack of other PCs used in this comparison will help smooth out that line. You might argue that it’s silly to compare a $3,300 Surface Book i7 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,100 Dell XPS 13 against an $1,800 MacBook Pro 13, or a $1,400 Dell XPS 15 against a $2,400 MacBook Pro 15. But these are all real-world models that you’ll find in a store, rather than configurations contrived to hit a number. Price differences are just part of the comparison puzzle.

    For the same reason, we’re not loading the same OS on all the laptops—no OSX on PCs, no Windows on Macs. Real people wouldn’t do that, and neither will we.

    CSO staff
    We opted to test on the operating system that people will run on the computer they buy.

    **03 osx windows
    Cinebench R15 multi-threaded performance:
    Our first test is Cinebench R15. This is a 3D rendering test based on Maxon’s Cinema4D engine. The test is heavily multi-threaded, and the more cores or threads you can throw at it, the better the performance. The test is is a pretty harsh reminder that if your tasks demand a quad-core, listen to them.

    Between the two quad-cores, the Dell XPS 15 crosses the finish line first—but not by much. Let’s just call it mostly a tie.

    Among the dual-cores, the Core i5-based MacBook Pro 13 is last, but not by much. It’s basically the same as the last-gen XPS 13 with a similar Core i7-6560U.

    The surprise is where the Surface Book i7 finishes. Its 6th-gen CPU is hanging right with the 7th-generation Kaby Lake CPUs in the new HP Spectre x360 13 and the new Dell XPS 13.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench multi threaded
    Cinebench R15’s multi-threaded benchmark shows you the clear difference between quad-core and dual-core CPUs. Longer bars indicate better performance.

    **Cinebench R15 single-threaded performance:
    Cinebench R15 has an optional test that lets you measure the single-threaded performance. It’s a valuable way to gauge how fast a laptop will be in applications or tasks that don’t use all the cores available.

    The surprise to many will be the result from the Dell XPS 13. Its 7th-generation Core i5 CPU could hang with the Core i7 chips on heavier loads, but on lighter loads, it ends up being last. That’s because Core i7 chips in laptops excel at short, “bursty” loads. Once you heat them up, the clock speeds crank back. When running a test in single-threaded mode, the Core i7’s advantage with short burst loads shows up big-time.

    The real shocker is how the HP Spectre x360 with a 7th-gen CPU comes out the clear winner. I would’ve expected the quad-core MacBook Pro 15 or Dell XPS 15 to lead the pack, but nope. That Kaby Lake CPU is indeed pulling its weight.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench single threaded
    We switched Cinebench R15 into a mode where it measures single-threaded CPU performance. Overall, there’s little difference in single-threaded loads.

    **Cinebench R15 OpenGL performance:
    Our last Cinebench R15 test measures performance with OpenGL, a popular graphics API used for rendering professional CAD/CAM applications and a few games.

    The results here break down into three bands. At the bottom is the new MacBook Pro 13 and an older Dell XPS 13 model. Both use Intel’s Skylake CPU and include “faster” Iris 540 graphics with 64MB of embedded DRAM inside the CPU. Both are nearly dead-even, which validates this test for comparing OSX to Windows 10 performance.

    The second band up is a shocker to me. The pair of 7th-gen Kaby Lake laptops from Dell and HP are a good 25 percent faster than the 6th-gen Skylake laptops in OpenGL. I really expected the Iris 540 laptops to come out in front. The results make me wonder whether this isn’t some driver optimization that Intel put into Kaby Lake but not Skylake.

    The last band is the graphics performance of the discrete-GPU laptops. Unexpectedly, the GeForce GTX 960M in the XPS 15 finishes just ahead of the GTX 965M in the Surface Book i7. The MacBook Pro 15, with its Radeon Pro 450, finishes in a firm third place. Some MacBook Pro reviews have said the graphics don’t measure up in games, while in “work”-related tasks, they rules. So far, I’ve not seen that to be true.

    macbook pro 15 cinebench opengl
    Maxon’s Cinebench R15 can also measure OpenGL performance. The MacBook Pro 15’s Radeon Pro 450 is competent, but the Surface Book i7 and XPS prevail.

    **GeekBench 4.01 multi-threaded performance:
    Another popular cross-platform benchmark is Primate Lab’s GeekBench. Experts may disdain its cross-platform results between ARM and x86. Within the same micro-architecture, however, I think it’s pretty kosher, especially when running the newest 4.01 version of the popular test. I also have a score to report for the MacBook Pro 13 with Touch Bar, as I cribbed the performance of the version with Core i5-6267U and Iris 550 from Macworld’s review.

    The first result we’ll look at is the multi-threaded performance. Like Cinebench R15, you can see the quad-core XPS 15 and MacBook Pro 15 step away from the dual-core laptops. It’s just more proof that if your tasks really need a quad-core chip, pay for it.

    On the dual-cores, the redesigned HP Spectre x360 13 again shows the newest 7th-gen Core i7’s clock speed advantage over the Skylake models. The Surface Book i7 and MacBook Pro are pretty much dead-even. For MacBook Pro 13 fans that might be something to crow about, because we’re talking about a Core i5 MacBook Pro 13 vs. a Core i7 Surface Book.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 multi threaded
    The PC laptops win a moral victory in GeekBench 4.01, but they virtually tie with the MacBook Pros.

    **GeekBench 4.01 single-threaded performance:
    Moving on to the single-threaded performance in GeekBench 4.01, there are a few patterns we can discern. First, that 7th-gen Core i7 in the HP Spectre x360 13 is indeed faster in lighter loads, outpacing the Surface Book i7 and the Core i5-equipped MacBook Pro 13 with Touch Bar.

    The Dell XPS 15 inches over the MacBook Pro 15, but the real takeaway is this: If you don’t do many multi-threaded tasks on your laptop, you don’t need a quad-core CPU.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 single threaded performance
    When we used Geek Bench 4.01 to measure single-threaded performance, there was scant difference between dual-core and quad-core laptops in lighter loads.

    **GeekBench 4.01 OpenCL performance:
    GeekBench also has an OpenCL test that simulates popular Computer Language tasks on a GPU that would normally be handled by the CPU.

    The first takeaway: Unlike in the OpenGL performance tests, the older Iris 540 in the Skylake dual-cores is faster than the Kaby Lake integrated graphics for whatever tasks Prime Labs thinks best represent OpenCL.

    The second takeaway: OpenCL loves fast GPUs. The Surface Book i7 and its GTX 965M run away with this test, and trash the MacBook Pro 13. For those who didn’t pony up for the MacBook Pro’s faster Radeon Pro 455 or 460 GPU, it’s hard to watch how thoroughly the the Surface Book i7 smokes the 450-equipped MacBook Pro. The Surface Book’s GTX 965M even makes a mockery of the GTX 960M in the XPS 15.

    macbook pro 15 geekbench 4.01 opencl
    Geek Bench 4.01 can also be used to measure OpenCL, which uses the GPU to perform tasks typically done on a CPU.

    **LuxMark 3.1 OpenCL GPU Render Performance:
    When you play the benchmarketing game, one truth that’s often overlooked is that no one test defines the entire category. You can’t take the results from Geek Bench 4.01 OpenCL and declare it representative of all OpenCL performance.

    To balance Geek Bench 4.01, I also ran the free LuxMark 3.1 OpenCL test. This takes a scene and renders it using the LuxRender engine on the GPU (or CPU if you ask it to.) I decided to skip the integrated-graphics laptops because I couldn’t wait days for them to render (kidding) and focused solely on the laptops with discrete graphics.

    The results put these GPUs a lot closer than the OpenCL numbers from Geek Bench 4.01 would have you believe. In the end, both the XPS 15 and Surface Book i7 again both clearly win. But would this be true if it were a Radeon 460 in the MacBook Pro 15? Probably not.

    macbook pro 15 luxmark 3.1 luxball gpu render
    We used LuxMark 3.1 to measure the OpenCL performance of the graphics chips. The higher the score, the better the performance. In this one test, the MacBook Pro 15 is at least competitive.

    **Blender 2.78 Performance:
    The last “work”-related graphics test we’ll run is Blender 2.78. This a free rendering application popular in a lot of indie movies. For a test render file, I used Mike Pan’s BMW Benchmark and set Blender to ray-trace the scene on the GPU rather than the CPU. The result is, frankly, beyond ugly. The Surface Book i7 finished in about eight minutes, and the XPS 15 took another two more minutes. The MacBook Pro 15 took more than an hour to complete the task.

    This doesn’t mean the MacBook Pro 15’s Radeon Pro 450 is a dog. The other benchmarks should tell you that the Apple isn’t that bad in some tasks. Still, this kind of performance disparity indicates a serious problem at the OS or driver level, or something with this compile of Blender. Unless or until that mystery is solved, you’ll want to do your Blender renders on a PC laptop.

    macbook pro 15 blender 2.78a bmw gpu
    Something isn’t right on the MacBook Pro 15 because while the Surface Book i7 took eight minutes to render a scene, the MacBook Pro 15 struggled for an hour. An hour.

    Tomb Raider performance
    The last graphics test I ran is Tomb Raider. It’s an older game available in both OSX and Windows and includes a built-in benchmark. While I could set the graphics settings the same on both platforms, I couldn’t quite sync the resolutions. Depending on the laptop, I could set the horizontal resolution at 1680-, 1650-, or 1600×1050 (the latter, for the Macs). The graphics setting on all of the laptops was Normal.

    If you can’t bear to look, don’t: The Surface Book i7 and XPS 15 soundly thrashed the MacBook Pro 15. I don’t think the Radeon Pro 460 would make a difference here, either. If you want gaming performance at any decent levels, no surprise—buy a PC.

    macbook pro 15 tomb raider 16×10 normal
    The GPU performance of the MacBook Pro 15 fared better in OpenGL tests. In Tomb Raider, it’s far, far behind the Surface Book i7 and XPS 15.

    **Battery life :
    The final test is for all-important battery life. I used the same 4K-resolution, open-source Tears of Steel short video, looping continuously. On the Windows laptops, I used the Movies & TV player, and on OSX Sierra, I used QuickTime. I wanted to use iTunes, as Apple does, but there appears to be no way to loop video in iTunes.

    All of the laptops had their screens set at 250 to 260 nits in brightness. All laptops had the adaptive brightness setting turned off. All were tested with Wi-Fi disabled and with earbuds plugged into the analog ports. One thing to note: The Windows laptops are left in their default power settings, which means they use their last bits of battery life to shut off unused apps and slightly dim the screen. OSX was set not to dim the display on battery—otherwise, it immediately dims the screen once unplugged.

    My results on the pair of MacBook Pros were amazingly similar. I started both early in the morning and watched until they died in the early evening. Both were minutes apart.

    Apple claims about 10 hours of run time in iTunes. We were pretty close in QuickTime at nearly 9 hours. The variance can be attributed to the video file and the settings the company uses.

    For the MacBook Pro 15, I’m going to say that’s pretty impressive. The battery life for 15-inch laptops with quad-core CPUs, discrete graphics, and high-resolution screens tends to be mediocre. For example, look at the XPS 15 and its six hours of run time. (Dell offers an XPS 15 battery with about 50 percent more capacity—but it’s also heavier.)

    Even worse is the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro, another quad-core laptop with the addition of a 4K screen. Ouch. Overall, I’d say the MacBook Pro 15 has decent battery life for a quad-core.

    Moving to the MacBook Pro 13, the result is a little more nuanced. With roughly nine hours of run time, it compares well to some laptops, such as the XPS 13 with a QHD+ touchscreen. But there are a lot more PCs ahead of it. You know, like the Surface Book i7, which sets the bar at an amazing 13 hours of video run time. Other laptops with better video stamina include the newest XPS 13, HP’s redesigned Spectre x360 13, and even the older Surface Book. When you consider that all three are also generally faster, it’s not good.

    macbook pro 4k battery life
    The Surface book i7 sets the bar with 13 hours of battery life, compared to nine hours or so for the MacBook Pros.

    **The cost equation:
    The most important question for users isn’t related to an obscure OpenCL benchmark but to how much these laptops cost. To help you understand just how much of a premium Apple and Microsoft are charging, I mapped out the cost of most of the laptops that appeared here, along with other configurations worth highlighting.

    That top-spec Surface Book i7, formally known as Surface Book with Performance Base, really pushes the boundaries of what people will pay for a dual-core laptop. To be fair, this is no ordinary laptop. It has a 1TB SSD and 16GB of RAM, plus pen support, a tablet mode, and probably class-leading GPU performance. But umm, yeah, 3,300 bucks.

    Apple is no stranger to nose-bleed altitudes. When you throw a Core i7, 1TB SSD, and 16GB of RAM into the MacBook Pro 13 with Touch Bar, you’re looking at $2,900. And you don’t even get the discrete GPU, touch, and tablet or pen support of the Surface Book. Apple’s most powerful MacBook Pro 15 tilts the meter all the way to $4,300. Granted, that’s with one of Intel’s priciest mobile CPUs and a whopping 2TB SSD, but that’s also the price of a modest used car.

    Compared to a “normal” PC, both Microsoft and Apple give you a lot less performance for your cash. The Dell XPS 15, which pretty much aces the new MacBook Pro 15 except in battery life, is $1,400.

    Take that Dell XPS 15 and load it up with a 1TB M.2 SSD, 32GB of RAM (which isn’t available on the MacBook Pro 15), a GTX 960M, 4K touchscreen, and a larger battery: $2,600. That’s only $200 more than what Apple charges for a machine with 16GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD, and the slowest Radeon Pro GPU.

    You can do the same with the new HP Spectre x360 or Dell’s current XPS 13. Both give you a lot more value than either the MacBook Pro 13 or the MacBook Pro 13 Touch Bar.

    Numbers don’t lie. Apple’s MacBooks are overpriced, and so are Microsoft’s premium Surface Book devices. The PC OEMs give you a lot more for your money.

    macbook pro 15 cost
    Apple and Microsoft clearly don’t provide the value that other PC makers can.

    Conclusion:

    Ten tests and one price comparison later, the PC wins. Again.

    That’s no surprise. The MacBooks are caught in a tough spot—even if they were running higher-performance configurations. They’re both ultra-expensive compared to most PCs, and at the top-end, outclassed in GPU performance by Microsoft’s comparably expensive Surface Book i7.

    It’s not all bad news for the Mac, though. The MacBook Pro 15’s battery life is impressive for a 15-inch laptop with a quad-core CPU and discrete GPU. Comparably powerful quad-core laptops we’ve seen can’t touch it in battery life. Even the MacBook Pro 13s do relatively well in battery life compared to a similar PC.

    The problem for Apple and Mac fans is PC makers just don’t ever stand still. And as we know, Apple seemingly does that now with its Macs.

  2. @Rash try to place your mobile phone far from your decoder it might be signal interference

  3. Hello Guys, i have a problem though not related to the article under discussion but i know you could still be of help. I use QSAT decoder for my multi-tv channels here in Ghana. When my mobile phone data is active, i begin to get scramble channels but immediately i put off my mobile phone data it also stops. Please help me out. Thanks!!!!

  4. Im not an expert but i know a few things. Been using windows from windows 95 to windows 10, so you might say i live and breathe windows. I recently started using mac OSX (installed on a dell laptop, hakintosh so to say). Atleast that proves that you can just as well run OS X (even a dual or triple boot) on a PC either on a VM or natively-ish, without paying 800$++. And you can also upgrade the hardware without breaking a sweat.

    Well OSX is good for developers and programmers as it closer to the popular UNiX system. But i dont agree its more user friendly to the average end user than windows. I Agree on the security stuff you mentioned, but like the other post above me said, only Apple has licence to their hardware so not much others can do about it (its almost like dstv in africa).

    On the topic of build quality, i also dont think apple tops them all. There have been beautiful machines of late especially from the HP, like the spectre x2 for example. Dell also had some nice designs and builds. Microsoft is also doing great with the surface line, both on the outside and inside of the devices.

    And then we come to the issue of Touch-based computing. i think that one depends on what you use your computer for. Just try and convice michael owen and co that they have to use a mouse and keyboard during the half time and fulltime analysis on that big a** screen of theirs and see if they will be done with their analysis before 2nd half begins. The problen with apple is that if they had to add touchscreen to their laptops, it would cost maybe 2000$ to get one.

    So for those that dont want to spend 800$ to use OS X on their computer, you can just do some googling and you’ll be able to build a hackintosh that might just perform as well or even better than a mac.

    • @kacjmen: different tales for different folks. ahACKINTOSH CAN NVER PERFORM AS WELL AS MACINTOSH. BUT IT IS A GOOD IDEA ANYWAYS. YES SURFACE LAPTOPS BY MICROSOFT ARE FANTASTIC HOWEVER, THE ISSUE OF PRICE COMES IN AS WELL SO WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE? I was and still am a windows user but i can never compare the satisfaction I derive, when using mac with that of windows. especially the issue of security.

      • A custome built hackintosh can perform bettar than a mac. U just need to pick the right components, and buy the time you spend 800$ you have something than can do a lot more things than a mac.

        The innovation of the hackintosh just proves os x can just as well be hacked.

        So mac or PC for an average user? It is just a matter of taste. For a developer, mac is better

        • @kachmen: why are you guys ignoring the user experience and security aspect of it?

          • User experience no. Windows has always been there before macs where accepted as daily drivers. Just for example, I have been looking for a way to minimize all windows so i can find somthing on the desktop, its almost imposible when i have a maximized window open. Am sure you know about this little but almost manadatory feature on windows, its just a click on a button. I just found out i have to write a small app to accomplish this on a mac. Am pretty sure there are many other things i cant do efficiently on the os X. This in my second week of using it. Almost everyone knows their way around a windows PC.

            For security, well yes, apple are ahead. But I dont think the average user needs to be that concerned about security as long as as they have the basic windows 10 bundled security tools and keep them updated. Plus the kasperkys, mcafees etc do a good job nowadays.

          • @Kachmen: there is nothing you want to do on a mac you won’t be able to do unless maybe you are new to it. It is either you do it from with the preferences or via an app. Mac still rule with user experience. Windows is getting their groove back with win 10 but they are not yet there. Do you know how smooth and fluid a mac os xis? Please get a genuine mac not hackintosn them do your test again.

          • Yea maybe am new but again i just found out running a batch file is a bit complicated on the the mac. I will be able to give a better review after a month or two maybe

          • @kachmen: Yeah Mac also has something similar to Window’s cmd

          • watch out for project neon

      • Only security aspect I totally agree, but others, NO. It’s possible for them to secure the OSX bcs they build and produce alone, no other OEMs is/are authorized to produce using mac OSX. It’s just like android platform vs windows phone & iPhone os

  5. People are jst thrilled and obsessed of the Apple brand logo.

  6. “In all its ramifications, a mac pc is more solidly built than any window PC irrespective of its manufacturer to the extent that windows manufacturers now copy mac’s designs.”
    Lemmy, honestly to me this your review/article is jst sentimental. I wonder if u had seen new Microsoft generation of laptop which d software giant calls 2 in 1 laptops ( Microsoft pro 4, Microsoft pro 3,Microsoft pro 5 and super Microsoft surface book) these are devices that outshine any MacBook, most especially d premium device which is full of great enormous innovations ” Microsoft surface book” ).
    OUTSTANDING BATTERY LIFE

    This is from a personal experience. I alway get at last 8 hours of battery life on MacBook pro when using it continuously. MacBook air even has a better battery life as you can go up to 11 hours of endurance time on its battery…..
    Pls check check Microsoft pro 4 nd surface book before u pass your judgment on battery life.
    A Mac integrates with iOS through Hand-Off

    Apple has further strengthened the ties between Macs and iOS devices, if you own an iPhone, iPad or an iPod touch and you do not own a mac, you are missing. This something that has carried through to OS X Sierra. Thanks to the Hand-off feature, you can start an email, note or document on your iPhone or iPad and continue on your Mac without syncing or saving anything to a cloud drive like OneDrive or Google Drive. This also applies for web searches, reminders, maps searches, and calendar adjustments. This close integration is a powerful selling point, as it means your devices all work together to help you complete your tasks without fuss or frustration…..
    Answer : try to adopt using windows phone and see how you won’t be able to integrate/ sync with you windows & windows phone and even on ur big screens.
    I can agree on better security which I believe Apple has advantage bcs no OEMs has never been given d license to produce MacOS expect Apple….its like comparing Android security gadget with iPhone OS and windows phone OS. It quite unfortunate that I can’t upload some images of surface book an surface pro 4 for you to view but I believe people on this blog can click on this link to view. https://www.google.com.ng/search?q=microsoft+surface+book+pictures&client=ms-android-sonymobile&prmd=inv&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&fir=hTu6tUWOfIsHiM%253A%252Cu9YHCyDG9hRrDM%252C_%253B98oY_wOQU7u-HM%253A%252Cu9YHCyDG9hRrDM%252C_%253B2Fm7385ilKE4RM%253A%252Cu9YHCyDG9hRrDM%252C_%253BoEjXUjWS3hydlM%253A%252ClXLI6y2X_aCMrM%252C_%253BfbyMTbWZF7lS0M%253A%252ChDvbQAVBSxYQLM%252C_%253BcD2tJcUPJWQ8cM%253A%252ClDqrAUD8IMZeAM%252C_%253BRYaRfkqTtrYp3M%253A%252CoKOhFWNfnUj-oM%252C_%253BANI7BogqvXgPhM%253A%252ChDvbQAVBSxYQLM%252C_&usg=__8rQUkjOkDrA-SVzpph7w46Z2OhI%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjE767w8JDSAhWKWxoKHabABn8Q7AkILA&biw=360&bih=616#imgrc=_
    This article from you Lemmy was fashioned to attack Windows which few of ur blog fans wil vehemently disagree with. You deliberately refused to mention some areas where windows has an edge. Well, as far as am concerned this article is neutral enough bcs can tell you there are some features in old windows7 that Apple jst added in latest upgrade MacOS-Sierra. Pls click on the link provided to compare better hardware between MacBook pro 2016 and Microsoft surface book 2016.

    • @Akinfad: you no use Windows reach me. I still have one currently. Mac is better overall. It’s a matter of preference anyways.

      • You wrote abt outstanding battery life… Pls check this out:
        Battery life

        This wouldn’t be complete without a battery run down test. As I can’t run MobileMark 2014 on OSX, I resorted to a standard video run down test. 

        I calibrated both laptops to the same 260 nit brightness, disabled screen dimming, and turned off the wireless. I also set the volume to approximately the same volume by listening to a test tone with a set of Samsung ear buds in each computer. Audio was left on with the same ear buds in the laptops.

        For a test file, I used the same 4K-resolution Tears of Steel .MOV file from my Premiere Pro encoding test. Normally, I like to run the same player, such as VideoLAN, to make it neutral. The last time I did that resulted in belly aching that the test is unfair because it doesn’t use each OSes’ optimized player.

        So for this test, I used the QuickTimeplayer on OSX El Capitan. I would have used iTunes as Apple does on its official run down tests but an apparent bug in it prevents videos from looping. The QuickTime player is the default player anyway which some argue is what you should use. On the Surface Book I used Windows Movies and TV player which is also highly optimized for power and Windows 10.

        Both manufacturers actually claim 12 hours of battery life for movie play back. The MacBook Pro 13 has a massive 75 watt-hour battery while the Surface Book’s is about 68 watt hours. That gives the MacBook Pro 13 about a 10 percent greater battery capacity over the Surface Book.

        After 8 hours, I called it a day. The MacBook Pro 13 was reporting 19 percent battery life with 2 hours of estimated battery life left. The Surface Book was reporting 29 percent with 2:26 left. I could have taken both down to zero, but I wasn’t going to sit in my cubicle and watch the moon rise.

        I give the Surface Book the win by a small margin. What’s really impressive is the Surface Book does it with a touch-screen which can consume 10 percent of run time and a smaller battery too. Both laptops actually offer fairly excellent run time overall but neither would have hit their rated life for lower-resolution file playback.

        The next morning

        When I clocked in the next morning, I decided to finish draining both laptops. I had shut both down and left them in place but decided to pick up where I left off. Full disclosure: I brain faded on the Surface Book and it didn’t loop after the first run and instead sat on a black screen at the end of the video for three minutes (which is how far the MacBook Pro 13 had gone into the second loop.) I then paused the MacBook Pro 13 and started the Surface Book playback while letting the MacBook Pro 13 sit paused for three minutes. I then started both at the beginning with it set to repeat.
        The MacBook Pro 13 tapped out at 1:41 which was a little short what it had predicted. The Surface Book ran for almost an hour longer giving up about 2:37 of run time on the remaining charge from the night before.

        If you add both together, that gives the MacBook Pro 13 about 9:41 of playing 4K content with the Surface Book running for 10:37.  This isn’t an ideal battery run down test condition but probably realistic as plenty of people turn off their computers during take off and then turn them back on in the air.
        The win clearly goes to the Surface Book but both get kudos for long video playback performance.

        Despite having a smaller battery and a touch screen, the Surface Book edges past the MacBook Pro 13 in battery life while playing 4K video.

        • @Akinfad: your argument even though it’s tenable, cannot be generalised. Why didn’t your post pitch surface against macbook air and do the battery endurance test? Am talking about average windows computer versus all Mac lines of computers.

          • Nagrom Ymmel says:

            ok, so do it, MBAir vs an XPS13….

            You cant ask for an average when all that Apple has is on the highend and windows covers from low to high.

  7. Been mailing u since yesterday noon abt Cccam, bt u aint replying.

    Plz check ur mail and reply Asap.

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